Hong Kong YouTubers – 7 of the Most Popular

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YouTube has indeed come a long way since its humble beginnings as a proposed dating site back in 2005.  

But what exactly does it mean to become a stand-out content producer on YouTube in Hong Kong? 

Let’s take a look at some of Hong Kong’s top YouTubers…

1. Taylor R – 1.15M subscribers, 146.61M video views

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The who: Born in Canada on 14 December 1988 and currently living between Hong Kong and Toronto, Taylor R created her YouTube channel in 2012 but actually didn’t start uploading any content until mid-2014. She uploads videos that cover a variety of topics including makeup, fashion, and lifestyle/vlogs about her life in general.

The why: While the most-viewed videos on her channel are very clickbait-y (e.g. ‘I wore Kendall Jenner’s boots for a day), it can be assumed she has such a large following because of the interest in following an aspirational Western woman making her way through life in Asia. Also, the videos themselves are edited well and have been shot with a high-quality camera/mic, which makes watching them easy.

2. Coffee Lam – 1.25 million subscribers, 147 million views

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The who: A former TVB actress who is also a certified yoga instructor, Coffee continued her career as an entertainer well after her TVB days and transitioned to YouTube. In 2020, her channel hit over 1 million subscribers, making Coffee the first lifestyle YouTuber in Hong Kong to surpass 1 million subs.

The why: Coffee has branded herself as a fitness/ wellness influencer through teaching yoga, and is a go-to yoga instructor for many well-known artists in Hong Kong. The majority of her content covers self-improvement as well as quick yoga lessons. Many local girls are also envious of Coffee’s amazing figure, hoping to achieve the same beautiful curves as Coffee through her yoga exercise on YouTube.

3. Dim Cook Guide-910,000 subscribers, 119 million views

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The who: This cooking channel established by a Hong Konger called Martin provides a variety of simple recipe videos and food-related content weekly. He also frequently collaborates with other brands to create various bespoke recipes.

The why: Dim Cook Guide mainly makes content in Cantonese, and teaches his audience how to make authentic dishes, snacks and desserts. In addition to uploading cooking videos, he’ll frequently do live videos in the evening, unboxing new products, cooking, etc. as a way to interact with subscribers. This channel has become more diverse over the years and recently collaborated with the “Corrupt the Youth” a social commentary channel that often discusses philosophical topics.

4. JASON – 980,000 subscribers, 451 million views

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The who: Jason (Big J) uploaded his first video in 2012, and his channel is mainly centred around game walkthroughs and Vlogs. He became the first YouTuber in Hong Kong to exceed 100 million views in 2015.

The why: Jason’s first video garnered around 100,000 views. Later, he made a bet with netizens on the HKGolden forum that if his post gets 1001 comment, he would shoot a vlog with a face full of makeup and go in public, after this stunt his channel gained more traction. His content mainly consists of Japanese culture, lifestyle and gaming.

5. Mira’s Garden – 730,000 subscribers, 152 million views

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The who: A full-time Youtuber based in South Korea, Mira’s channel mainly covers informative videos on Korean culture and travel vlogs. She started uploading videos in 2016 and became the fourth in Hong Kong to hit over 500,000 subscribers. Mira was also named “Hong Kong’s Fastest Growing YouTube Star” by Google HK.

The why: Mira, who is fluent in Korean, will talk about aspects of Korea and Korean culture that are not commonly known. In the early stages of her YouTube career, her videos included Korean subtitles so that her Korean subscribers can understand her content, making them more inclusive. In addition to interesting topics in Korea, Mira also likes to make travel and lifestyle vlogs covering her trips to Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and other places.

6. Nikmatul Rosidah – 1.31M subscribers, 304.2M video views

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The who: Joining all the way back in October 2013, Nikmatul Rosidah Dobson is an Indonesian who resides in Hong Kong with her Canadian husband and their three children. Most videos uploaded to the channel are about cooking mostly Indonesian dishes, though there are quite a few videos about the family and their life in general.

The why: It can be suggested that, due to Indonesian being the main language spoken in all of the videos, the majority of viewers are Indonesian themselves. It could also be speculated that these viewers are possibly interested in moving to Hong Kong and as such are keen to follow someone who is doing that. 

The videos are quite poorly produced, with low quality sound, editing and camera shots. Though this may somehow add to the authenticity or ‘real’ feel. 

7. NuclearProductions – 1.42M subscribers, 355.22M video views 

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The who: After doing extensive desktop research on this channel, we were unable to really find out all that much apart from the fact that it was created in May 2014 and is run by someone based in Hong Kong who refers to themselves as a ‘sh*tty SFM animator’ on their Twitter page. Created by Valve, SFM (Source Filmmaker) is a 3D computer graphics toolset that can be used to create animation within Valve’s Source game engine.

The why: Each of the videos uploaded is a comical/satirical take on popular games, and it seems like NuclearProductions was one of the original SFM content creators to take this approach which has led to the channel’s popularity. For example, the most viewed video on the channel (with 92 million total views) uses characters from the hugely-popular MMORPG game PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (PUBG) and is hilariously named “PUBG Animation – Battle of Noobs [SFM]”.

What is a YouTuber? 

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You might think it’s as simple as recording some video and uploading it as is. And while many people take that approach, they’re not (usually) the ones who make it big. It may surprise you that it takes a lot of pre-production planning, sometimes a number of takes, and hours upon hours of editing to create the content you see being pumped out by the popular channels. Sometimes, there is a team of people that have worked on the videos you watch. Of course, though, this level of professionalism doesn’t spread across every piece of content that’s uploaded. 

And when you’re talking about 500 hours’ worth of video uploaded per minute, you can imagine there’s a LOT of subpar content to wade through to get to the good stuff. Unless, that is, you go directly to the top players in the market – like the following 7 most popular YouTubers in Hong Kong right now (individuals, not brands). 

Where to from here?

The common trend across these channels is quality content. Yes, it might seem obvious that uploading low-quality videos won’t do you or your brand any favours. But quality doesn’t just stop at video, sound and editing; it’s important to know your audience and figure out what type of content they really want. And whether you’re just starting out or have a bunch of videos already uploaded to your channel, always remember – the metrics should dictate the content you create.

You can also run all your other social platforms with the same concept! Learn more about how you can grow your follower count like Hong Kong’s most popular KOL’s.

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